Employees with New York’s correctional facilities are calling on Governor Andrew Cuomo to restrict visitation again at some correctional facilities.

Some in-person visitation was restored by the state Department of Corrections and Community Supervision back in August. Right now, physical contact is not permitted except when inmates are allowed to have a brief embrace by their visitors at the beginning and at the end of their visits.

According to 2WRGZ Visitors are screened before they are permitted to enter a facility with temperature checks, questions regarding health and travel history. Correctional facility employees are asking that the screening be expanded to include a negative COVID-19 test result.

Just like most scientists have predicted, the nation is seeing spikes in COVID-19 cases, so it makes sense that some correctional facilities throughout the state have seen spikes in cases. That means that employees of those correctional facilities are once again at risk of infection.

Michael B. Powers, the president of the New York State Correctional Officers and Police Benevolent Association, expressed his concern over the rise in COVID-19. He said, “Experts predicted a new wave of COVID-19 this fall, and that prediction has come to fruition.“

Mr. Powers released a statement asking Governor Cuomo to reinstate his suspension at facilities that are seeing a rise in COVID-19 cases. In a comparison to nursing home facility restrictions he said, “Nursing homes across the state have had serious restrictions placed on them when it pertains to family visitation. Should similar standards be put in place at state prisons for those wishing to visit convicted felons? Staff should expect no less protections from our Governor and DOCCS.”

Employees who work in correctional facilities are entitled to the same protections as employees who work anywhere else. Would you feel safe working in a correctional facility right now?

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