I know I can't be the only person who was oddly captivated by the grocery store lobster tank as a child. When you're really little, it's basically a free aquarium. All these alien-looking crustaceans, just hanging out together with their bumpy red and black shells.

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Getty Images
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Of course, when you get older you understand that tank is usually just a sinister penultimate stop right before the final boil. I say usually, because sometimes fate steps right on in.


Some lobsters are born different. They were never meant to end up deliciously buttered on a roll, they were destined for greatness - a full life in the show. For example, a lobster that turned up, by sheer happenstance, at the Market 32 in Brunswick. See, unlike all their lobster brethren they were bright, jack-o-lantern orange.    
WNYT
WNYT
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I've seen a handful of stories about rare blue lobsters being found by fishermen before, but orange is even more unusual - a 1 in 30 million chance. (For extremely bizarre reference, the statistical odds of you ending up canonized by the Catholic Church is approximately 1 in 20 million.) The only lobster more rare is the insanely pretty iridescent lobster, which is a 1 in 100 million shot.  

When the Market 32 workers saw this lucky, lucky orange lobster, they knew it would be shame to end up on the plate of some bib-wearing seafood afficionado. So where do you send a hyper rare lobster to live out the rest of his natural days in comfort and fame? The VIA Aquarium in Rotterdam.


I feel like there should be a naming contest. My vote would be Lou. I say long live Lucky Lou Lobster.

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