For some, Wordle is friendly. It's easy to pick up and play. It pretty much looks like some type of employment test from 20 years ago. There are no ads, no fancy pop-ups or graphics, just some words and a small virtual keyboard. Oh, yeah, it's free. That's cool too. However, that may change soon.

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On Monday, the New York Times announced that it had purchased the free word game that has become a daily obsession for millions. The specific price was not disclosed but it is understood to be in the low seven figures. That's a nice price for Josh Wardle, the Brooklyn software engineer that invented the game. According to the Associate Press, "Wardle originally made the game for his partner, but released it to the public in October. On November 1st, only 90 people had played it. Within two months, that number had grown to 300,000 after people began sharing their scores on social media."

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With the purchase, there is great concern about the game remaining to be free. The New York Times, which features popular word games like Spelling Bee and its legendary crossword puzzle, stated, “at the time it moves to The New York Times, Wordle will be free to play for new and existing players, and no changes will be made to its gameplay.” The key phrase is "at the time it moves to the New York Times, Wordle will be free to play..."

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Wordle enthusiasts are concerned about what happens after the word game moves to the New York Times. Most likely, it will remain "free" with a subscription or some form of to the media empire. If you want to play Wordle now, you have to visit its website. Simply type in a five-letter word. If any letters turn green, you got the right letter in the right place. Yellow letters mean right letter wrong place and gray letters mean they are not in the word of the day. It is pretty simple to play and can be very addictive!

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